Small People

Small People

Monday, April 15, 2013

Myths (about Homeschooling)

**For those of you joining me from the A to Z challenge, welcome! I'm homeschooling through the alphabet.**

There is A LOT of misinformation out there about homeschooling. I'm hoping to answer some of the myths today.

M is for Myth

Myth 1: Homeschooled children have no socialization skills. This is quite simply, just plain wrong. There are many, many more places to learn and practice socialization skills outside of the classroom. In fact, when I was teaching in brick and mortar schools, there wasn't time for students to socialize at school outside of lunch and recess. My small people have the opportunity to interact with many other people - children and adults - in the course of our daily lives. Homeschooling families also have many opportunities to take advantage of cultural events and personal activities because their school day is typically shorter than a traditionally schooled student with the added bonus of not having homework to do in the afternoons.

Myth 2: Very few people homeschool their children. According to the US Census Bureau, an estimate of as many as 2 million American children are homeschooled, and that number is growing 15 to 20 per cent each year.

Myth 3: Homeschooling parents aren't qualified to teach their children. Parents who homeschool represent a range of education levels. While it is helpful to have a basic knowledge of core subjects, it isn't necessary to be a rocket scientist or to know everything about every subject. I am learning so much right alongside my children. Truth be told, many teachers in public schools didn't get teaching certification with their education. Due to shortages in certain subjects, many schools are giving out-of-area certifications.

Myth 4: It's difficult for homeschooled students to get into college. Many homeschool students are actually taking college courses before graduating from high school. Also colleges and universities are actively seeking homeschooled students because of their independent study and critical thinking skills.

What homeschooling myth have you heard that I haven't addressed here?

14 comments:

  1. All so true (that they are myths). We spend SO much time 'socialising', and have more time for it too. I feel sorry for the kids stuck in school and missing out on playing with their friends.

    Rinelle Grey

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rinelle,
      I do too! I don't know if my children would have as much time to "socialize" in the afternoons if they were in school and having to do homework when they got home.

      TaMara

      Delete
  2. Love the post. Current home-school mom to one who formerly home-schooled the three older children who are grown and two are in college. One of those kids fluently speaks Spanish, Arabic and German. Myths debunked! That is all. :)

    Shirletta @ Shirleyisnotmyname

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shirletta,
      I love to hear from moms who have been in the "homeschool trenches"! Thanks for stopping by. It sounds like you have definitely debunked the myths with your children.

      TaMara

      Delete
  3. That's an amazing figure. Nearly 2 million children homeschooled. Just wow. That's a lot of kids. And a lot of dedicated parents.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hello from A to Z. While I don't have plans to homeschool my children, this is a topic I've always been interested in reading about. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Knew most of what you posted, but disagree about teachers teaching without certificates. All the schools in our area require more then a bachelors degree, they require a Masters with lots of follow up classes continuing ed and most definitely a certificate. I've always felt the biggest thing against home schooling is, you and the kids have a mixed relationship. If a child has trouble at school they can escape they come home...and if home is bad, they can escape to school. Home schooling doesn't provide that. Several of our friends did it, and we considered it because our daughter was so advanced; but I'm glad we elected not to. Our friends who did had mixed results; but then they did it for different reasons to so it's to be expected they would have different results. I think one difficulty they have is they don't learn how to learn from a teacher they don't like or respect. They don't have the same opportunity to learn coping skills, when the kids beside you makes you nuts; but you still have to learn to focus.

    Like most things in life, it's not right for everyone. I'm sure though it's less difficult for the parents not having all those extra emotional difficulties that come with school to deal with.

    We can't all be a lawyer or a doctor without training, I tend to feel the same about education. I've seen some folks do a wonderful of it, and others shameful.

    Best of luck to you and your gang.
    a-z

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandy,
      That may be true for your area. I know that where I live, a lot of the math and science teachers have math or science degrees and then have to get certified while they're teaching. I also taught in the public school system (with a Masters in Education) and saw many certified teachers who I would never want teaching my children.

      You bring some valid points as to why homeschooling isn't good for every family. I think each family has to evaluate what is best for their children.

      TaMara

      Delete
    2. I taught in three excellent schools where they were quite excited that I had a teaching degree... but it wasn't required, either by the school or by law.

      Delete
  6. Yep... I find these myths quite humorous.

    What is amazing to me is just how much TIME is spent in public (and even private) school on discipline. In my public teaching days we spet pretty much 95% of the time on discipline and 5% on teaching. This was very frustrating, and the pace was really slow. When I taught in the private setting, it was still about discipline at least 25% of the time. Which explains why homeschoolers can get all their work done by noon... even if they only start at 9am!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jenelle,
      I experienced the same thing when I was teaching in brick and mortar schools; most of my time was spent either on discipline or lining them up to go to the bathroom, lunch, recess, art, pe, etc.

      TaMara

      Delete
  7. That was a great. I know I've heard the myths about socialization and college, but didn't really agree. I really believe that if the parent is dedicated, it can be an excellent education, and your blog has only confirmed it for me.

    ReplyDelete

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